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The impact of COVID-19 on free trade in Africa

Sep 26th, 2021 • by S. Gustafson

As the world continues to grapple with the ongoing presence of COVID-19, it has become clear that the pandemic’s impacts extend far beyond human health. Economic growth, markets and supply chains, poverty, and food security have all experienced ripple effects from the pandemic itself and the measures taken to stop the spread of the deadly virus. In Africa, the outbreak of COVID-19 coincided with the signing of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA), leading to concerns about the potential negative impacts on free trade targets in the region.

Transform Nutrition West Africa: Time to build on the momentum

Sep 21st, 2021 • by ROOSMARIJN VERSTRAETEN

This post originally appeared on IFPRI.org

The COVID–19 pandemic, ongoing conflicts, and other problems made 2020 a difficult year for global nutrition. Knowledge will be crucial in addressing current nutrition issues and advancing the nutrition agenda for 2021 and beyond. Transform Nutrition West Africa (TNWA), a project led by IFPRI and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation from 2017-2021 and now concluding, has worked to put stakeholders and knowledge generation at the heart of decisions about policies and programs for maternal, infant, and young child nutrition.

Making the most of intra-African trade: Insights from the 2021 Africa Agriculture Trade Monitor

Sep 21st, 2021 • by JULIE KURTZ

This post originally appeared on IFPRI.org

With the COVID-19 pandemic disrupting livelihoods, and the new African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) now beginning to influence food flows, agricultural trade in Africa is in a state of flux, with both challenges and opportunities. While AfCFTA implementation has begun, some crucial negotiations remain to be completed, and the full scope of its impact is not yet clear.

Examining the gendered impacts of cash transfers on migration in Mali

Sep 21st, 2021 • by MELISSA HIDROBO, VALERIE MUELLER, SHALINI ROY AND MICHAEL WANG

This post originally appeared on IFPRI.org

Migration is a crucial element for economic development, as it offers workers in low- and middle-income countries ways to diversify and increase their income as well as ways to smooth their consumption over time. In addition, migration allows workers to send remittances, providing their households with the resources needed for investments. Yet social norms and income constraints also influence who migrates and why.