nutrition

African Leaders for Nutrition Initiative

Food security has long been a development goal in Africa south of the Sahara, as well as in other developing regions. However, in recent years, it has become increasingly recognized that basic food security – simply having enough food to eat – is not enough to ensure long-term, sustainable growth and development. Rather, nutrition security – having enough high-quality, nutrient-dense food to eat – is needed to improve health outcomes, drive economic growth, and end hunger in all its forms.

Nutrition-sensitive ag in Burkina Faso

 

Policy Seminar: Nutrition-sensitive agriculture program in Burkina Faso improves children's nutritional outcomes

This post originally appeared on the IFPRI.org blog. Written by Smita Aggarwal.

2017 Global Nutrition Report

According to the latest Global Nutrition Report, released in early November, the world remains off-track on meeting nutrition targets, and financing to address malnutrition is not adequate to meet the needs of the problem.

2017 Global Hunger Index Released

Hunger levels in Africa south of the Sahara remain among the highest in the world, according to the latest Global Hunger Index (GHI), released today by IFPRI, Concern Worldwide, and Welthungerhilfe. 

New Malabo Montpellier Report

While significant progress has been made in reducing hunger and food insecurity in Africa in recent decades, around one in five people in the region continue to face chronic undernourishment. In a new report from the Malabo Montpellier Panel, “Nourished: How Africa Can Build a Future Free from Hunger and Malnutrition”, researchers take a systematic country-level approach to identify where progress has been achieved and how to replicate and scale up successful policies.

Rising Cost of Nutrition

A diverse and nutrient-dense diet is key in the fight against malnutrition. However, in many developing countries, poor households are unable to afford an adequately nutritious diet.

Gender and Food Security in Malawi

Researchers and policymakers have become increasingly cognizant of the role that gender plays in food security in developing countries. A new IFPRI Discussion Paper takes an in-depth look at the implications of gender roles in household food security in Malawi and finds that improving joint access – i.e. access for both men and women – to agricultural and nutrition information and training can be an important driver in increasing households’ food security.

Does Increased Market Access Mean Better Nutrition?

Efforts to increase rural incomes and reduce rural poverty in developing countries often focus on policies to lower transport costs and increase market access among poor and remote rural populations. Despite the growing importance of such policies, however, it is not entirely clear to what extent and through which channels increased market access impacts rural individuals’ and households’ nutrition outcomes and overall wellbeing.

Measuring Kenya's Progress on Malabo Declaration Targets

At the African Union Summit in Malabo (Equatorial Guinea) in June 2014, African governments adopted the Malabo Declaration on Accelerated Agricultural Growth and Transformation for Shared Prosperity and Improved Livelihoods.

Household Production and Child Nutrition

In 2011, 44 percent of Ethiopia’s children under the age of five suffered from chronic malnutrition.[1] Reducing that number is important not only for children’s current health and well-being but also for their future health and economic productivity as adults. Thus, improving childhood nutrition by expanding children’s diets to include more nutrient-dense foods like legumes and fruits and vegetables has become an important goal for many policymakers.

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